Engeniate http://www.engeniate.com Better Teams, Stronger Leaders, Productivity Maximized Wed, 24 Jan 2018 19:12:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 ENGENIATE Adds the Market’s Newest Selection Assessment, PXT Select™ /engeniate-adds-markets-newest-selection-assessment-pxt-select/ /engeniate-adds-markets-newest-selection-assessment-pxt-select/#respond Wed, 17 May 2017 21:25:51 +0000 /?p=1233                                   Contact Information: Liz Ramos ENGENIATE (415)952-0130 liz@engeniate.com www.engeniate.com FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE ENGENIATE Adds the Market’s Newest Selection Assessment, PXT Select™ to Business Offering ENGENIATE partners with PXT Select™ to help organizations make smarter hiring decisions. Vallejo, CA – May 17, 2017, ENGENIATE, adds innovative [...]

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Contact Information:

Liz Ramos
ENGENIATE
(415)952-0130
liz@engeniate.com
www.engeniate.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

ENGENIATE Adds the Market’s Newest Selection Assessment, PXT Select™ to Business Offering
ENGENIATE partners with PXT Select™ to help organizations make smarter hiring decisions.

Vallejo, CA – May 17, 2017, ENGENIATE, adds innovative new selection assessment PXT Select™ to their business offering.  The new hiring assessment empowers organizations to navigate the competitive talent landscape with confidence and ease.

“We are proud to partner with ENGENIATE to bring this new assessment to market”, said Scott Allison, Vice President and Director at Wiley. “Our partners are trusted advisors to their clients and have a powerful impact on organizations. Great organizations know that success begins with hiring the right people. By working with PXT Select and ENGENIATE organizations of all sizes experience greater insight and confidence in their hiring process.

Too many organizations make crucial hiring decisions based solely on impressions rather than data. Powered by the latest advancements in assessment technology, PXT Select provides the hiring manager with insight into a candidate’s cognitive abilities, behavioral traits, and interests, including tips about the candidate’s potential job fit and relevant job-specific interview questions.

“Hiring should be more than filling a vacancy.  We have been searching for a proven, validated hiring tool that helps organizations establish long term fit and based on multiple Beta test and our existing client feedback, we are thrilled to be adding this valuable solution to our suite of services,” said Liz Ramos, Founder, ENGENIATE.

About PXT Select™
PXT Select makes the very human decisions about hiring simpler and smarter. Combining over 20 years of research with powerful assessment technology, PXT Select and its intuitive suite of reports helps fill the gap between the resume and the interview. This powerful selection assessment provides organizations with actionable objective data about candidates and employees in a simple to understand format that helps them to interview better and hire smarter. PXT Select™ is available exclusively through the PXT Select Authorized Partner network.
Learn more at www.PXTSelect.com.

About ENGENIATE
Located in the San Francisco Bay Area, Engeniate serves C-level business leaders who understand that a prosperous business starts with energized employees who find meaning in their work and take pride in common goals. Through comprehensive team training, leadership development and a partnership approach, we help our clients build engaging and accepting workplace cultures that unleash individual freedom and accelerate team success.
www.engeniate.com

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/engeniate-adds-markets-newest-selection-assessment-pxt-select/feed/ 0 Purpose & Talent: Propellers to Engagement /purpose-talent-propellers-engagement/ /purpose-talent-propellers-engagement/#respond Sun, 31 Jul 2016 22:29:34 +0000 /?p=1213 Leaders and organizations are constantly seeking ways to increase their employee engagement.  Managers, human resource professionals and even front line employees approach employee engagement from their own angles, here are a few examples that might sound familiar: Managers - seek to provide flexible work hours, allowing employees to work from home part of the week, [...]

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Leaders and organizations are constantly seeking ways to increase their employee engagement.  Managers, human resource professionals and even front line employees approach employee engagement from their own angles, here are a few examples that might sound familiar:

Managers – seek to provide flexible work hours, allowing employees to work from home part of the week, providing developmental opportunities.

Human Resource Professionals – seek to create wellness programs, employee events to create fun (holiday parties, birthday celebrations, etc.), employee contests.

Employees – seek higher wages, training opportunities, career growth opportunities, etc.

Are these approaches wrong? Of course not.  All of these things can promote employee loyalty, and help create and shape a healthy company culture. However employers should ask themselves the following:

  • Are our efforts addressing the indicators that create employee engagement?
  • How are you defining employee engagement?
  • Are you focusing on activities that give you the highest ROI towards achieving employee engagement?
  • Are you measuring your efforts and using the correct indicators?

Employee engagement is an employee’s emotional and psychological commitment to their roles and the organization, which goes beyond traditional loyalty.  This begs the question: How is your organization leveraging the talent in your employees and connecting this talent to each employee’s role?  

In Gallup’s article, “A Purpose Has to Be a Lot More Than Words,” they share: “Only about one-third of the U.S. workforce strongly agrees that the mission or purpose of their company makes them feel their job is important…” Gallup Polls

One of the most effective ways to employee engagement is to help create a strong connections between the talent in each employee and the purpose of the organization.  Each employee has to feel that that their role is connected to the purpose of the organization and that isn’t easily achieved through most of the traditional approaches shared above.

As the leaders of an organization make the purpose of the organization known they must also share what the measurements of success look like. Here are some ways employee engagement can be re framed by the parties we listed above:

Managers – guide employees in drawing clear connections between their natural talents, their roles and how their roles support the measurements of success that make the organizational purpose a reality.   Support unique developmental opportunities that encourage a strong fit between the employee’s talents and strengths and the new role.

Human Resource Professionals – establish sustainable training initiatives that equip managers to make those connections and recruit talent into the organization that not only considers skills/experience for hiring, but encompasses a broader fit into the organizational identity and culture. Help the organization design career paths and growth opportunities for the workforce that are creative and move beyond moving “up the ladder,” which isn’t always aligned with the talents of employees.

Employees – Contrary to typical beliefs, employees themselves are also responsible for their own engagement.  The manager is the most influential role in employee engagement, but this doesn’t take away from an employee’s personal ability to play a part in their engagement and success.  They can study what conditions during their work day take them to be most engaged and disengaged and take initiative to replicate those conditions and ask for what is needed to create those circumstances.

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Top Five Components for an Effective Telecommuting Policy /top-five-components-effective-telecommuting-policy/ /top-five-components-effective-telecommuting-policy/#respond Sun, 31 Jul 2016 20:42:19 +0000 /?p=1210 The following article was contributed by  Wu Castillo, P.C. – A law firm providing advice and representation for California employers. So your employees want to work from home? Consider these top 5 components for an effective telecommuting policy. In early 2013, Yahoo!’s CEO, Marissa Mayer, announced that Yahoo!, starting in June 2013, would no longer [...]

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The following article was contributed by  Wu Castillo, P.C. – A law firm providing advice and representation for California employers.

So your employees want to work from home? Consider these top 5 components for an effective telecommuting policy. In early 2013, Yahoo!’s CEO, Marissa Mayer, announced that Yahoo!, starting in June 2013, would no longer allow employees to telecommute.  Back then, Yahoo! had approximately 500 employees who routinely worked off-site/at home, and who were physically disconnected from the other 12,000 Yahoo! employees.

At the time, some commentators opined that Mayer’s decree was a step backwards, and working moms in particular felt betrayed by Mayer (who was a new mother).  Others opined that Yahoo! was doing the right thing and this change in policy would improve Yahoo!’s productivity and bottom line.  Now, in 2016, while we can look back and see how/if the no-telecommuting policy affected Yahoo!, the more interesting question for most employers (and employees) is:  did Yahoo!’s new policy violate any employment laws?

The short answer is:  No.  Yahoo!, just like any other employer, is free to place requirements on where its employees must perform work.  This policy was announced with plenty of advanced notice (more than three months), and it applies across the board to all Yahoo! employees.  Thus, on its face, the policy change was legal.

However, there are creative plaintiff’s attorneys, and we noted in 2013 at least one early potential employment-law related vulnerability to the then-new policy.  Specifically, employees who telecommuted as a reasonable accommodation for a disability or medical condition should still have been allowed to telecommute if providing this type of accommodation did not pose an undue burden on Yahoo!  Indeed, it would have been very challenging for Yahoo! to have claimed an “undue burden,” given the company’s size and revenue.  Admittedly, this scenario may have pertained to only a few employees, but regardless, Yahoo! hopefully considered this and other exceptions to the no-working-from-home policy.

TELECOMMUTING POLICY BASICS

In contrast to the Yahoo! policy, many companies encourage, or at least allow, telecommuting.  Any employer that does so, however, must be sure to have a clear and comprehensive policy on telecommuting.  Some of the issues the telecommuting policy should address (or, at the very least, the employer should be ready to handle), include the following:

  1. Discrimination:  Employers need to be consistent when determining what positions are eligible for telecommuting.  Employers should not make decisions based on who the employee is, but rather on what the position requires.  Decisions should be made on objective criteria, and inconsistencies must be explained by legitimate business justification, otherwise the employer could face discrimination claims.
  2. Wage and Hour Issues:  The company should require employees to keep records of their work time.  This is particularly true for non-exempt employees who may be entitled to meal and rest breaks, and overtime.  Just because employees are working from home, some formalities of the traditional workplace must remain intact – like recording work hours and breaks.
  3. Confidentiality:  Companies would be wise to revisit and strengthen employee confidentiality policies since telecommuters, by the very definition, are accessing and using company information (including confidential and perhaps trade secret information) remotely, without managers around.
  4. Workspace Conditions:  Here the issues range from OSHA requirements to workers’ compensation issues.  Companies need to be aware of whether the telecommuting employee has a safe and dedicated workspace, and how to handle workplace injuries that a telecommuter suffers.  Indeed, because telecommuters work in isolation, typically no witnesses will be on hand to verify a telecommuting employee’s claim of work-related injury.  Employers may also consider requiring telecommuters to allow the employer to inspect the workspace periodically.
  5. Expense Reimbursement:  There are a lot of issues here.  For example, if it is mandatory for employees to use their personal mobile phones for work, the employees should receive a reasonable reimbursement for that expense.  Not only must employers determine how to handle this reimbursement for mobile phones, but employers should also pre-determine how they will handle at-home internet access/wi-fi costs, computer/printer costs, and the like.  Unfortunately, there is no one-size-fits-all solution that suits every employer.

What do you think?  Does your company have a clear and complete telecommuting policy?

DISCLAIMER:  Information provided on this website is not legal advice, and it does not create an attorney-client relationship with Wu Castillo, P.C., nor should you act on anything stated in this article without conferring with the Author or other legal counsel regarding your specific situation.

 

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4 Ways to Spot Leadership in Action /4-ways-to-spot-leadership-in-action/ /4-ways-to-spot-leadership-in-action/#respond Thu, 30 Jun 2016 19:45:59 +0000 /?p=1203 “Leadership” and “management” are often used interchangeably, but there are key differences among the two.  The manager has a specific role to work on a one to one basis with those whose day to day work they direct.  From a strengths-based perspective, they help to identify talent within their direct reports, set clear expectations, motivate, [...]

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“Leadership” and “management” are often used interchangeably, but there are key differences among the two.  The manager has a specific role to work on a one to one basis with those whose day to day work they direct.  From a strengths-based perspective, they help to identify talent within their direct reports, set clear expectations, motivate, engage and develop these individuals for performance in their current role and growth into their next step. It’s a key role that, the fabric of an organization that employee see the company.

Leadership is distinctly different.  Let’s take a look at how leadership looks in action.  This isn’t meant to be an exhaustive list; I look forward to your contributions to the conversation:

  1. Spirit of service – Leaders help spread a spirit of service.  They are passionate about the cause, mission or goal that they lead others towards.  Leadership isn’t necessarily granted by someone’s title, rather by their commitment to serve others.
  2. A one to many relationship – Leaders have an impact and create influence on the entire organization.  You might have been inspired by a leader along your professional journey to whom you never reported.  Outside of the workplace, you have surely been touched by leaders in politics, human rights movements, etc. that you’ve never met personally or lived in a different era, yet still managed to impact your life.
  3. Leadership creates Vision, Alignment and Execution. All three components are critical for any leader. One of the biggest differences between and experienced and inexperienced leader is the ability to see vision as a critical part of their role as a leader.  They must be willing to explore “What’s next?” for their organization, help define it, craft it and get others on board, ensure the pieces are in place to turn that vision into reality! Management can be part of the required structure that leadership must put in place for execution of the established vision.  Straw, Julie, et al. The Work of Leaders. San Francisco: Wiley, 2013. Print.  Each leader has a unique set of talents, priorities and styles to accomplish this, it’s important to be aware of how this uniqueness impacts their ability to deliver on Vision, Alignment and Execution.
  4. Leadership sets the tone for culture – Culture is made up of many components and we won’t dive into definitions here, simply put, culture is what an organization does, how it behaves, what is upheld by its leaders. Culture creation is intentional and it starts at the top.  An organization can have a set of Core Values that talk about being inclusive, fun, puts the customer first, etc. but if this isn’t upheld by leadership, it becomes more damaging to have a stated culture that isn’t upheld. Recently I was delivering a training session with a team, leadership had brought me in to help send a message of a respectful workplace among other things.  We held various sessions throughout the day and in one of the sessions, a middle manager was brave enough to ask, “What can we do when the person being disrespectful is a top leader?” It took a lot of courage and she was visibly nervous to ask.  I see this often, when training is mistakenly thought of as a silver bullet.  The culture that leaders create and uphold makes the biggest difference.  Things will and do happen in organizations that go against the stated desired culture, this is where leaders and managers alike have a responsibility to address and make visible that they are willing to stand for what the desired culture looks.

I look forward to connecting with you on these topics and more.  Are you a showing up as a leader? More importantly, are you showing up as the leader you’d be inspired to follow?

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3 Key Areas Managers Need to Focus On: A Legal Professional’s Perspective /3-key-areas-managers-need-focus-legal-professionals-perspective/ /3-key-areas-managers-need-focus-legal-professionals-perspective/#respond Fri, 24 Jun 2016 19:56:51 +0000 /?p=1199 The following article was contributed by  Wu Castillo, P.C. – A law firm providing advice and representation for California employers. Members of management must both manage and lead their team.  In today’s world where professional relationships easily spill over into the social arena (whether via happy hours or on social media) balancing the day-to-day management [...]

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The following article was contributed by  Wu Castillo, P.C. – A law firm providing advice and representation for California employers.

Members of management must both manage and lead their team.  In today’s world where professional relationships easily spill over into the social arena (whether via happy hours or on social media) balancing the day-to-day management of a business with the “soft skills” needed to inspire and lead a team can be tricky.  Thus, it is imperative to ensure compliance with employment laws and to lead and inspire a team without crossing the lines of illegal/inappropriate behavior.  To this end, employers should develop, and enforce, robust policies that ensure compliance with employment laws.  

Here are three key areas for employers and their leaders to focus on:

  1. Managers should be trained on, and understand, the Employer’s policies prohibiting discrimination, harassment and retaliation in the workplace.

This includes setting forth explicitly the type of behavior that will not be tolerated in the workplace, along with the consequences that will follow should an employee engage in inappropriate behavior.  Some employers adopt progressive discipline policies, which provide for a tiered system of discipline that can lead to dismissal.  Such a policy should always include language reserving the right to terminate an employee immediately depending on the egregiousness of the behavior the employee engaged in, and in keeping with an at-will employment policy.  When feasible, members of management should be trained not only on how they are expected to behave, but also on how to recognize, report and investigate (when appropriate) improper workplace behavior.  The key is to prevent inappropriate/illegal behavior when possible, and to take immediate corrective measures when prevention is not possible.

  1. Managers must remain professional even if friends with subordinates.

Special attention should be paid to management’s interaction with subordinates on social media and outside of the workplace.  The line between manager and friend can blur very quickly, and sometimes results in claims of unfair treatment.   Thus, it is important for managers to maintain impartiality and treat their subordinates equally.  And, it is often recommended that managers should not “friend” subordinates on social media.

  1. Managers must understand enforce other company policies, like meal and rest period requirements, and overtime laws.  

Employers should adopt written wage and hour policies, requiring employees to correctly record all time worked, to prevent “off-the-clock” work, and to ensure compliance with meal and rest period laws.  Managers must be careful to never discourage an employee from taking their meal and rest breaks, and should follow-up and counsel employees who violate the policy.

Overall, managers should be on high alert for inappropriate workplace behavior, including ensuring that they themselves don’t engage in behavior that can be misconstrued.  As agents of the employer, managers have a duty to act when inappropriate behavior is reported or observed.  In California, a pro-employee state, managers risk being found personally liable for failing to act upon and correct certain illegal workplace behavior.  The bottom line – lead by example and set the tone for a respectful and professional workplace environment.

DISCLAIMER:  Information provided on this website is not legal advice, and it does not create an attorney-client relationship with Wu Castillo, P.C., nor should you act on anything stated in this article without conferring with the Author or other legal counsel regarding your specific situation.

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Are Your Employees Properly Classified As Exempt or Non-Exempt? Updates to Overtime Pay /overtime-pay/ /overtime-pay/#respond Fri, 27 May 2016 06:16:58 +0000 /?p=1194 An organization’s culture is largely driven by managers.  Who do you choose to lead in your organization? If you are focusing efforts in having a sustainable engaged workforce, having the right managers in place is key. We often see some foundational issues with the classification of these managers OR the leeway these managers are given [...]

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An organization’s culture is largely driven by managers.  Who do you choose to lead in your organization? If you are focusing efforts in having a sustainable engaged workforce, having the right managers in place is key. We often see some foundational issues with the classification of these managers OR the leeway these managers are given in classifying their direct reports.  In either case, organizational leaders need to be well aware of classification issues.  The following article was contributed by  Wu Castillo, P.C. – A law firm providing advice and representation for California employers.

Will You Be Compliant With The Final Federal Rule On December 1, 2016?

 

HOT OFF THE PRESS!  On May 18th, 2016, President Obama and Secretary Perez announced the publication of the U.S. Department of Labor’s Final Rule governing overtime pay and exemptions.

As discussed below, the Final Rule significantly changes federal requirements for exempt and overtime pay.  While the Final Rule does not change the “duties prong” of the exemption test, now is the best time to ensure you comply with the intricate web of exemption requirements.

Complying with overtime exemption requirements can be tricky and can lead to many legal claims against employers, whether through a government agency audit or because a current or former employee files a claim.

Employers often think that if an employee is paid at least double the California minimum wage, then that employee is automatically exempt.  Alternatively, some employers assume that if an employee primarily performs “exempt” duties, then a fairly generous salary will ensure exemption status.

Both of these assumptions are dangerous and can lead to substantial exposure for the employer.

Under both Federal and California law, the test for overtime exemption consists of two prongs: salary and duties.

 

The Salary Basis Test

To satisfy the salary prong, exempt employees in California generally must earn a minimum monthly salary of no less than two times the state minimum wage for full-time employment (with the exception of (1) computer professionals – who must earn at least $41.85 per hour or a yearly salary of $87,185.14 in 2016, and (2) certain commissioned salespersons, and a few other professions).

California’s current minimum wage is $10.00/hr.  Thus, a California exempt employee must earn at least $41,600.00 per year.  While California has historically been more generous on this front than Federal law, a significant change is coming December 1, 2016 courtesy of Federal requirements.

 

The NEW Federal Final Rule

On May 18, 2016, President Obama and U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas E. Perez announced the publication of the U.S. Department of Labor’s Final Rule. The Final Rule requires that exempt employees be paid at least $ $47,476.00 per year starting December 1, 2016.

The Final Rule also sets the total annual compensation requirement for highly compensated employees subject to a minimal duties test from $100,000 to $134,004 per year, and establishes a mechanism for automatically updating the salary and compensation levels every three years.

For the first time, the Final Rule permits employers to count nondiscretionary bonuses, incentives, and commissions toward up to 10 percent of the required salary level for the standard exemption, so long as employers pay those amounts on a quarterly or more frequent basis.

 

California employers would need to comply with both California and Federal requirements (whichever is more favorable to employees).  

 

The Final Rule goes into effect December 1, 2016, and employers must comply with the new salary rates starting on that date.  Future automatic updates to the new thresholds will occur every three years, beginning on January 1, 2020.  Click here to read the U.S. Department of Labor’s “Questions and Answers” regarding the Final Rule.

 

The Duties Test

Generally, to satisfy the “duties” prong under both California and Federal law, exempt employees must be “primarily engaged in” exempt activities while at work.  The phrase “primarily engaged in” means that more than 50% of the employee’s work time must be spent engaged in exempt work.

The primary allowable exemptions are: (1) Executive/Managerial; (2) Administrative; (3) Computer Professional; (4) Learned Professional; (5) Creative Professional; (6) Outside Salesperson; and (7) Inside Salesperson (with additional restrictions).

While the duties tests for each of these exemptions vary, they all require that the exempt-status employee perform high-level work that a typical hourly employee does not engage in, such as: the ability to make financial decisions for the employer, the ability to hire/fire employees, inventing, designing computer programs, exercising discretion and independent judgment, etc.

 

Misclassification Can Lead To Significant Exposure

Having an employee “misclassified” as exempt when the employee does not meet the two-part test above, can devastate an employer.  Employees, including former employees going back at least three years, can bring legal claims including unpaid overtime, missed meal and rest breaks, itemized wage statement violations, and waiting time penalties, per employee.

Additionally, the employer may also be sued via a purported class action, and/or a collective action under the Private Attorneys General Act.

 

Conclusion

Some possible tasks for employers to perform to gauge compliance with exemption requirements, include: conducting an internal audit.

First, evaluate whether each exempt employee meets the salary test for exemption (noting the different salary requirements for computer professionals, commissioned salespersons, and other special professions).

Second, review current job descriptions, and actual minute-by-minute job tasks performed by exempt employees and analyze whether each exempt employee is “primarily engaged in” exempt work duties for at least 50% of their work time.  If an employer does not currently have job descriptions, consider developing them, ensuring that the employee actually engages “primarily in” exempt tasks.

Also consider updating Employee Handbooks to clearly define “exempt” and “non-exempt.”

Finally, take steps to prepare for the increase in salary requirements set forth in the Final Rule and execute the changes by December 1, 2016.

 

 

DISCLAIMER:  Information provided on this website is not legal advice, and it does not create an attorney-client relationship with Wu Castillo, P.C., nor should you act on anything stated in this article without conferring with the Author or other legal counsel regarding your specific situation.

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Are You Setting Up Your Managers to Fail? /setting-managers-fail/ /setting-managers-fail/#respond Fri, 20 May 2016 05:35:59 +0000 /?p=1193 As leaders of people, one of they key responsibilities of a manager is to develop his or her  team members. Team members need to be developed for the current role and for their future growth. One of the most misaligned roles tends to be the role of the manager; those who are in charge of [...]

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As leaders of people, one of they key responsibilities of a manager is to develop his or her  team members. Team members need to be developed for the current role and for their future growth.

One of the most misaligned roles tends to be the role of the manager; those who are in charge of directing the work of others.  

Why? Think about the last manager you promoted.  

Why did you promote them?  Was it because you saw that they were great at identifying talent, setting expectations, motivating and developing others? Probably not…

Even through those are all key areas that a successful manager needs to hone in on.

 

Being a Great Performer Is Not the Best Reason to Promote a Manager

One of the most common answers to the question, “Why did you promote that person into a management role?”  is because they were a great performer in their role as an individual contributor.

This is not the best reason for putting them in a role where they are in charge of others… You could have taken the best independent sales person you ever had and put them in a place where they were not naturally equipped to thrive. Consequently you are setting them up for failure in their new role and causing frustration with the team members who report to them.

Gallup’s 2015 State of American Manager report found that managers account for at least 70% of the variance in employee engagement scores across business units.

Misalignment happens in all types of roles, but not having the right managers in place sends ripple effects across your organization.

4 Pitfalls to Avoid When Promoting a Manager

Why is there such misalignment in roles? Do a quick audit of the following mis-steps many organizations fall into:

  1. Lack of Career Growth Paths
    Does your organization have various paths for career growth? This is critical to maintaining talent within your organization and minimizing the risk of putting someone on the next “rung of the ladder” because that was the only option for financial and professional growth.
  2. Inability to Direct Natural Talents &  Build Strengths 
    How good are your managers and leaders at spotting talent?  The ability to identify this and seek opportunities (projects or positions) for this talent to be applied and developed into strengths that serve your organization is key.
  3. Being Out of Tune with an Employee’s Development Goals
    How often have you taken the time to ask, “If you could do anything, what would that be?”  Hearing directly from your team members and digging into the reason they’re drawn to something is gold and so much better than guessing…
  4. Lack of Training for New Role
    Maybe they could do well in their role if they were given proper training to succeed.  I never cease to be amazed when I work with a new manager or one that has been in their role for quite some time and learn they never received training on how to transition from being an individual contributor to being in charge of people.  

How can your organization get ahead of these mis-steps?  I look forward to hearing how your organization is tackling these issues and ensuring your employees are in the right role.

 

Strengths Based organizations need leaders who walk their talk. Are you one of them?

Come join the conversation, this month we’ll be focusing on: Creating Leadership Influence – Focusing on the ROI – Debunking the “well rounded” myth – Leadership is about service: who are you serving?

Click Here to Register Online >> We look forward to connecting with you live.

 

 

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Five Tips to Identifying Top Talent /five-tips-identifying-top-talent/ Sun, 01 May 2016 05:37:30 +0000 http://engeniate.wpengine.com/?p=1172 Effective leaders know how to mine for talent. They not only mine for talent, they pan for pure gold. It’s an ongoing process that’s required to build, develop and sustain effective teams and organizations. There are critical instances when this need arises, including: Hiring Forming Project Teams Developing Team Members Succession Planning Creating Successful Partnerships [...]

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Effective leaders know how to mine for talent. They not only mine for talent, they pan for pure gold. It’s an ongoing process that’s required to build, develop and sustain effective teams and organizations. There are critical instances when this need arises, including:

  1. Hiring
  2. Forming Project Teams
  3. Developing Team Members
  4. Succession Planning
  5. Creating Successful Partnerships

Barriers to Effectively Mine for Talent & Strengths

This job isn’t always easy. There are some definite challenges to being effective at discovering authentic talent and sift out learned skills and experience.   Yes, skills and experience are important, but those are learned, picked up through practice and time. Talents, on the other hand, are those naturally recurring patterns of action and behavior that can be polished into strengths that produce amazing outcomes.   Some of the barriers include:

People not being “in tune” with their true talents – if you just ask someone, “Tell me 5 things you’re naturally great at?” How many people do you think could answer you easily and with confidence? Not very many. We’re predisposed to think about what we have learned in school, through work experience, etc.

A natural disposition to “impress” – we want to look good in the eyes of others, it’s a given. If we know we’re being observed or are being asked specifically in an interview format, we’ll make our worst qualities sound like the greatest things since sliced bread.

Overcoming our own talent filters – Naturally, each of us is driven by the filters of our own talents. I’m automatically going to look for who can get “the job done” as I’m leading with my Executing domains. I know I tend to lean towards those I can see myself building a deep bond with, driven by my Relationship Building strengths.

An experienced miner of talent can overcome all of this. To get started, here’s what you can do.

Be a Top Notch Miner of Talent – here’s how:

The Four Talent Domains help us narrow down what type of talents to mine for. To be effective in building an “A” team, you must:

  1. Identify what’s needed for the role: Rank the importance of each of the four talent domains.
  2. Identify how your culture is unique – How does this impact the talents needed for the job? For example, you can have two jobs that are exactly the same in title, Customer Service, but operate very differently in two organizations based on the level of empowerment that each organization gives them to resolve issues. I’m sure you’ve experienced being transferred 5 times to get something fixed and a stellar experience where the first person you speak to resolves your issue.
  3. Identify 1 critical talent from each of the domains – Craft questions that seek out this talent. One way to determine the critical talents is to look at proof of success in other top performers, what do they have in common?
  4. Ask open-ended questions that seek out whether their talents line up with the talents you identified. “Tell me what you love most about selling?”
  5. Listen for specifics CLUES to Talent – Pay extra attention to where the individual has experienced Rapid Learning, ask them, “What type of activities/roles have you learned quickly? Or What activities come easily to you now?” 2) Satisfaction “What activities do you find most fulfilling?” This will tell you the longevity of the stamina they will have in the long run towards certain types of activities.

I look forward to hearing how you’re putting all of this into action. Imagine what a difference it could make to the quality of your team to constantly be looking for talent in this way, strategically positioning each team member, the team and the entire organization in a position to win BIG! Need support in customizing this approach for your organization? Let’s connect.

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Want More Collaboration? Stop labeling them Millennials. /want-collaboration-stop-labeling-them-millennials/ Sat, 26 Mar 2016 05:34:22 +0000 http://engeniate.wpengine.com/?p=1169 Recently I had the opportunity to attend a wonderful conference in San Antonio. Besides visiting the infamous site of the Alamo, I also had the amazing opportunity to hear Patrick Lencioni, best-selling author and Founder of The Table Group, give the keynote for this event. His talk was inspiring, informational and entertaining; more to come [...]

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Recently I had the opportunity to attend a wonderful conference in San Antonio. Besides visiting the infamous site of the Alamo, I also had the amazing opportunity to hear Patrick Lencioni, best-selling author and Founder of The Table Group, give the keynote for this event.

His talk was inspiring, informational and entertaining; more to come on the great nuggets of his talk. When he concluded he opened up the floor for questions. A gentleman stood up and asked about the impact of millennials in the workforce. Patrick’s response was priceless; let me give you a little background as to why I found his response particularly refreshing.

I happen to be on the cutoff between Generation X and the dubbed Millennial generation, so depending on what chart you’re looking at, I straddle both. There have definitely been times when our generation has been labeled with traits that I don’t embrace and actually repel, such as, having a sense of entitlement, being self-absorbed, wasteful and greedy. I take offense to those, wouldn’t you? It bugged me that such blanketed statements were handed out based on the year you were born.

Back to Patrick’s response… “I’m so tired of hearing about the Millennials! Give them a job, if it doesn’t work, fire them.” The room erupted in laughter and so did I! He elaborated, “Tell me more about their personality traits, their strengths, who they are as individuals and then we can learn something meaningful about them.” Finally! Someone said out loud what I had always thought and felt!

Why do we insist on lumping people together in broad categories? Putting people in “buckets” is a mistake, it creates more division and focuses on our differences as a broader workplace community, which is counterproductive to collaboration. You’ve probably heard that we can be unstoppable if we feel connected to a cause, this is true for me, but that doesn’t mean that it isn’t just as true for a baby boomer or anyone else.

You can learn a lot more about a person from their individual makeup.

For your Individual Team Members:

Get to know the things about them that truly matter, regardless of what year they were born in.

  • Who are they as individuals?
  • What are their strengths?
  • Who do they partner best with?
  • What are their interests?
  • What type of rewards motivates them most?
  • What are the values that guide their life?

For your Organization:

There is validity to the concern that as baby boomers exit the workforce, there will be an exodus of knowledge and experience that has contributed to the success of many organizations. An organization’s focus should be around identifying solutions to minimize the impact of this reality.

  • Is your organization fostering a culture of mentoring and knowledge transfer?
  • What is your organization doing to capture the knowledge of key stakeholders?
  • How is your organization using this knowledge to incorporate it into your systems and processes?

Rather than focusing on trying to improve your employee engagement and organization’s performance by creating blanket statements about segments of your workforce, invest the time in finding out the answer to the questions posed above, leveraging the information or putting a plan in place to execute on on the missing pieces.

Patrick-Lencioni

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Three Tips for Employee Appreciation /three-tips-employee-appreciation/ Fri, 04 Mar 2016 06:32:27 +0000 http://engeniate.wpengine.com/?p=1167 This week I had the opportunity to spend a day working with Managers on Strengths-Based Management. The timing could not have been more perfect as this week we celebrate Employee Appreciation, and so many of the concepts of Strengths-Based management are centered around this often underutilized behavior, appreciation. Every leader and manager in an organization [...]

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This week I had the opportunity to spend a day working with Managers on Strengths-Based Management. The timing could not have been more perfect as this week we celebrate Employee Appreciation, and so many of the concepts of Strengths-Based management are centered around this often underutilized behavior, appreciation.

Every leader and manager in an organization holds the keys to ensure the organization has a culture of appreciation.

Why does employee appreciation even matter? I’ll answer that question, with a series of other questions (must be a coaching thing…). Have you ever asked your team to stay late when you have a tight deadline? Maybe work weekends or extra days of the week because you’re swamped or short staffed? I believe most of you have found yourselves in that position at one time or another.

Nobel prize winner and notable psychologist, Daniel Kahneman, states that in any given day we experience 20,000 moments, but we only really remember the moments that we anchor as positive or negative. Expressing appreciation towards your employees creates more of those positive memories that are anchored around their experience of working for you, of being a part of your team and your organization. Do you think that creating a culture of employee appreciation could help you when you need your team to go “the extra mile?” I’ll allow you to answer that for yourself.

The three P’s: Results of Engaged Employees

There are many ways that organizations measure employee engagement. Some organizational leaders and influencers of organizational culture focus on monetary rewards, creating perk programs, such as wellness program contests. All of these angles and initiatives are great, but do they have an impact on the type of engagement that they want to see? When I meet with leaders, they share they want engagement that increases productivity, profitability, and passion. The first two results are clear and common. Passion is not as evident, allow me to explain. When employees have passion you can feel that they are excited about their jobs, the contribution they make and the difference the organization makes to those they serve. You can sense this passion in the way the team gels together.

3 Tips to Show Employee Appreciation

Appreciate Talent – In order to accomplish turning one of the four keys of great managers, select for Talent, it’s critical that we first learn to appreciate the talent in our team.

Recognize your team members how they want to be recognized – sounds like the platinum rule right? Treat others as they want to be treated. Another key of great management is motivation. For each of your team members, do you know HOW they like to be recognized? Managing from a strengths-based perspective is so powerful, it provides a road map that tells you what their biggest contributions are (so you can help them develop it and recognize it within them) and what their biggest needs are. More often than not, I hear from employees how much they appreciate the verbal, personal recognition directly from their manager. Every person is wired differently and feels appreciated by being recognized in a way that best suits them.

Appreciate the Contribution of the Role – By human nature, we like to be appreciated as individuals. I’d be surprised if I asked someone, “Do you like to feel appreciated?” and hear them say “no.” Beyond being recognized as individuals, as members of a team and broader organization, employees want to know that the contribution made by their role is important, noticed and appreciated.

If you’d like to experience what kind of a difference appreciation can make, I invite you to take on the Appreciation Challenge!

Appreciation Challenge: 3-4 Drill

For 3 consecutive weeks (15 work days), start each day with appreciation:

  • Appreciate a different employee each day
  • Spend no more than 4 minutes sending that employee an appreciation note expressing something that you appreciate about them.
  • At the end of the 3 weeks write down your reflections on
  • How you felt by starting each day with appreciation
  • If you noticed any differences in employee interactions and perspectives

Allow Employee Appreciation day to serve as the beginning phase of self-reflection for how you lead. Do you know the answers to the questions posed above? Do you apply that knowledge with your team?

If you’d like to create or enhance a culture of appreciation, take a step further and apply these tips on an ongoing basis. Get dialed in with your strengths and those of your team and leverage them in way that’s rewarding to each team member and helps increase your organization’s productivity, profitability and passion!

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